Ric Hassani | 'Thunder Fire You'

Submitted by Ikenna Okeh on Thu, 03/04/2021 - 21:51

A Review of Ric Hassani's 'Thunder Fire You'

Ric Hassani has released a song titled 'Thunder Fire You'. In certain circles, the song's title and the theme are being considered offensive hence it has been banned from his country's airwaves. We have reviewed this song to evaluate its musical merits as befitting of any work of art. 

One thing is sure to first grab your attention the moment you begin listening to Ric Hassani’s ‘Thunder Fire You’, and that is the unique instrumentals that have become the signature style of a certain caliber of contemporary Nigerian artists, notable amongst them being Asa, Johnny Drille, and Darey Art Alade.

Ric Hassani’s vocal delivery is over-powering in a mellowing manner

This informed choice of instrumental composition is gradually gaining a following amongst an elitist crop of Nigerian music listeners who dwell on the fringes of the mainstream; all thanks to the consistency of its contemporary pioneers who constantly take into account the fact that the local population is as heterogenous in preferences as in taste.

It’s as though the song formed a bridge along which the overflowing contents of his soul reach into yours.

Ric Hassani’s vocal delivery is over-powering in a mellowing manner, like the scent of a rose; alluring and pleasant, yet subtly staking a claim on your senses. This is laudable because it would have been a total waste of tasteful instrumental composition if Hassani’s vocals weren’t this good and befitting of this tasteful instrumental accompaniment.

The song has a very engaging and interactive pace.

Ric Hassani’s delivery of this song is top-notch. You can feel the weight of the expression he flawlessly delivers in this song. It’s as though the song formed a bridge along which the overflowing contents of his soul reach into yours. Apparently, he intentionally set out to achieve this. The periodic pauses are legendary. It lends such theatrical dynamics to the song, thus involving more than the sense of hearing. It is so well calculated to suspend the listener, make him waver where he stands and then sweep him off again as the song resumes.

Talking about the theme, one would consider it culturally original, yet dishonest.

Although the backup doesn’t makeup so much of the song, yet where they are sparingly applied, they are done with a clear purpose; to spice up the song rather than constitute the main stuff. Perhaps Ric must have thought this over while cooking up this song. The song has a very engaging and interactive pace. Probably, the theme of the song could only best be conveyed at that pace.

... this song will trend for a long time because it’s looking to be the soul and anthem of a notable number of Nigerians who won’t rely on the Nigerian airwaves

Talking about the theme, one would consider it culturally original, yet dishonest. It draws attention to a much-needed debate on the need to highlight the thin line between selfishness and love. Come to think of it, how would the song start off saying how the narrator wishes the best for someone but then goes on to commit them to hell because things never worked out? All the same, its honesty is to be appreciated in that it reflects social reality. Isn’t it what art is meant to be? An undiluted reflection of reality?

Maybe the Nigerian Broadcasting Corporation should have considered this before placing a ban on this song from the airwaves. And would this ban in any way stand in the way of this song’s acceptance amongst local audiences? That’s doubtful. Nigerians relate greatly with this theme and the National Broadcasting Corporation only drove it underground, there, to be talked about and thrive.

This song will trend for a long time because it’s looking to be the soul and anthem of a notable number of Nigerians who won’t rely on the Nigerian airwaves for their doses of ‘Thunder Fire You’.