REVIEW | 'I Just Wanna Tell You'

Warren Gallimore

A review of Warren Gallimore's 'I Just Wanna Tell You' feat. Austin Leeds and E Marie.

Music encompasses worlds, presents them to the listener and leads them along a sensory experience of its lanes and highways in manners that are soothing and unassuming. ‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ does just this. It’s a world being presented to the listener. It’s not the future, neither is it fantasy. It is the past. Listening to the song brings you face-to-face with flavours of a time that’s rarely remembered, drowned in contemporary artistry.

‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ is a testimony of the genius in simplicity. It might be said that everything about the song is intentional; of course it has to be, as this can’t possibly be some error in a science lab in the search for a coronavirus cure. The simplicity in the choice of instrumental accompaniment and the song’s overall performance can be said to convey nostalgia, perhaps. It possibly could be intended to influence present-day choices and point a few ears to flavours being ignored into extinction. When last did you listen to disco or something with a blend of it? You might not have, but we think there is a trend in the making, albeit silent, and ‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ is not entirely out of the box.

Listening to the song brings you face-to-face with flavours of a time that’s rarely remembered

In recent times Disco has been making shy approaches at contemporary music. In 2014, the then Nigerian musical duo, PSquare, did a musical collaboration with American rapper, T.I. The song was titled ‘Ejeajo’. There was such a generous measure of Disco blended into the song’s creation and performance. It might not have made waves within the Nigerian listening audience then, but it sure made an impression. And now, here we are with Warren Gallimore’s ‘I Just Wanna Tell You”.

There is something rich and expressive about the vocal quality with which the lyrical content of ‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ is performed. It’s rich, honest, and suitably expressive. Even when raised onto high pitches you still feel its integrity retained. It is so much in sync with the mood of the song which the instrumental accompaniment actually seeks to complement, and does so perfectly. You will agree that this is one thing to look out for in seeking out the merits of a song; the flow between the vocals and instrumental accompaniment. It’s seamless, with no one competing against the other for dominance.

There is something rich and expressive about the vocal quality with which the lyrical content of ‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ is performed.

‘I Just Wanna Tell You’ is a song about love, not the happy kind as you will want to hear. It’s a song about love and desire turned down, and a heart strained to breaking for the sake of love not reciprocated. The chorus is very catchy that you hardly can wipe it off your mind at one listening. It is lyrically expressive. You just can’t help but catch the feeling in the lyrics as expressed in the vocals.

It’s a song about love and desire turned down

This is a song that we highly recommend for its artistic merit. There is no doubt that the footprint it leaves in the consciousness of contemporary and historical musical arts will be referenced and revisited consistently.